A Space Adventure : NASA Exhibit

Venture into the thrilling journey of mankind’s exploration of Space. Its an amazing world of space exploration. Be inspired by the ambitions of those who dared to dream and conquer the unknown.    Go Fever In the late 1950s, scientists and politicians in the Soviet Union and the United States competed fiercely to perform firsts… Read more »

Expedition reveals how the dinosaur-killing asteroid shook and shaped the Earth

Expedition reveals how the dinosaur-killing asteroid shook and shaped the Earth Stephen Kershaw, Brunel University London The asteroid thought to have killed the dinosaurs smashed into the Earth with a billion times more energy than the atomic bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Many believe the impact caused a mass extinction, wiping out the dinosaurs… Read more »

The psychology behind why clowns creep us out

The psychology behind why clowns creep us out Frank T. McAndrew, Knox College For the past several months, creepy clowns have been terrorizing America, with sightings of actual clowns in at least 10 different states. These fiendish clowns have reportedly tried to lure women and children into the woods, chased people with knives and machetes,… Read more »

Where Art meets Science

The unique design of ArtScience Museum, Singapore is certainly a draw for many visitors from around the world. The Future World exhibit on lower floor is entertaining and no doubt shows the future of art: playful, interactive, colorful. One can hear kids 50 years from now, “Art just sat there and did nothing??” This art moves and… Read more »

How Game of Thrones’ Emmy-award-winning battle scene was made

How Game of Thrones’ Emmy-award-winning battle scene was made Peter Allen, University of Melbourne Melbourne based visual effects provider Iloura – also known for creating ghosts for the 2016 reboot of Ghostbusters – has won its first Emmy for the Game Of Thrones (GoT) season six episode “Battle of the Bastards”. Iloura’s first time working… Read more »

Big Bang Data: What does data mean to you?

Big Bang Data: What does data mean to you? This information age has led to an explosion of information available to people. With production of data every single day, right through the searches on Google, posts on Facebook or images on Instagram, this is changing the way we interact with each other in the real… Read more »

Why a four-day workweek is not good for your health

Why a four-day workweek is not good for your health Allard Dembe, The Ohio State University Many employers and employees love the thought of a four-day workweek. Supposedly, a four-day work schedule allows workers extra time to pursue leisure activities and family togetherness. Spurred on by visions of spending more time at the beach, many… Read more »

What exactly is the scientific method and why do so many people get it wrong?

What exactly is the scientific method and why do so many people get it wrong? Peter Ellerton, The University of Queensland Claims that the “the science isn’t settled” with regard to climate change are symptomatic of a large body of ignorance about how science works. So what is the scientific method, and why do so… Read more »

Where’s your data? It’s not actually in the cloud, it’s sitting in a data centre

Where’s your data? It’s not actually in the cloud, it’s sitting in a data centre Brett Neilson, Western Sydney University; Ned Rossiter, Western Sydney University, and Tanya Notley, Western Sydney University Without data centres, today’s world stops. Flights are grounded, Wall Street closes, and the internet grinds to a halt. Yet despite their emergence as… Read more »

Ancient life in Greenland and the search for life on Mars

Ancient life in Greenland and the search for life on Mars David Flannery, NASA Australian geologists say they have found ancient microbial fossils in 3.7 billion-year-old rocks in Greenland. The finding, reported in Nature last month, is some 200 million years older than previously accepted fossils. Previously, the best-known evidence for life in these rocks… Read more »

Latest
  • A Space Adventure : NASA Exhibit

    Venture into the thrilling journey of mankind’s exploration of Space. Its an amazing world of space exploration. Be inspired by the ambitions of those who dared to dream and conquer the unknown.    Go Fever In the late 1950s, scientists and politicians in the Soviet Union and the United States competed fiercely to perform firsts… Read more »

  • Expedition reveals how the dinosaur-killing asteroid shook and shaped the Earth

    Expedition reveals how the dinosaur-killing asteroid shook and shaped the Earth Stephen Kershaw, Brunel University London The asteroid thought to have killed the dinosaurs smashed into the Earth with a billion times more energy than the atomic bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Many believe the impact caused a mass extinction, wiping out the dinosaurs… Read more »

  • The psychology behind why clowns creep us out

    The psychology behind why clowns creep us out Frank T. McAndrew, Knox College For the past several months, creepy clowns have been terrorizing America, with sightings of actual clowns in at least 10 different states. These fiendish clowns have reportedly tried to lure women and children into the woods, chased people with knives and machetes,… Read more »

  • Where Art meets Science

    The unique design of ArtScience Museum, Singapore is certainly a draw for many visitors from around the world. The Future World exhibit on lower floor is entertaining and no doubt shows the future of art: playful, interactive, colorful. One can hear kids 50 years from now, “Art just sat there and did nothing??” This art moves and… Read more »

  • How Game of Thrones’ Emmy-award-winning battle scene was made

    How Game of Thrones’ Emmy-award-winning battle scene was made Peter Allen, University of Melbourne Melbourne based visual effects provider Iloura – also known for creating ghosts for the 2016 reboot of Ghostbusters – has won its first Emmy for the Game Of Thrones (GoT) season six episode “Battle of the Bastards”. Iloura’s first time working… Read more »

  • Big Bang Data: What does data mean to you?

    Big Bang Data: What does data mean to you? This information age has led to an explosion of information available to people. With production of data every single day, right through the searches on Google, posts on Facebook or images on Instagram, this is changing the way we interact with each other in the real… Read more »

  • Why a four-day workweek is not good for your health

    Why a four-day workweek is not good for your health Allard Dembe, The Ohio State University Many employers and employees love the thought of a four-day workweek. Supposedly, a four-day work schedule allows workers extra time to pursue leisure activities and family togetherness. Spurred on by visions of spending more time at the beach, many… Read more »

  • What exactly is the scientific method and why do so many people get it wrong?

    What exactly is the scientific method and why do so many people get it wrong? Peter Ellerton, The University of Queensland Claims that the “the science isn’t settled” with regard to climate change are symptomatic of a large body of ignorance about how science works. So what is the scientific method, and why do so… Read more »

  • Where’s your data? It’s not actually in the cloud, it’s sitting in a data centre

    Where’s your data? It’s not actually in the cloud, it’s sitting in a data centre Brett Neilson, Western Sydney University; Ned Rossiter, Western Sydney University, and Tanya Notley, Western Sydney University Without data centres, today’s world stops. Flights are grounded, Wall Street closes, and the internet grinds to a halt. Yet despite their emergence as… Read more »

  • Ancient life in Greenland and the search for life on Mars

    Ancient life in Greenland and the search for life on Mars David Flannery, NASA Australian geologists say they have found ancient microbial fossils in 3.7 billion-year-old rocks in Greenland. The finding, reported in Nature last month, is some 200 million years older than previously accepted fossils. Previously, the best-known evidence for life in these rocks… Read more »

  • Why time seems to go by more quickly as we get older

    Why time seems to go by more quickly as we get older Christian Yates, University of Bath When we were children, the summer holidays seemed to last forever, and the wait between Christmases felt like an eternity. So why is that when we get older, the time just seems to zip by, with weeks, months… Read more »

  • Virtual reality brings new dimension to conservation

    Virtual reality brings new dimension to conservation Ivy Shih, The Conversation Virtual reality technology is introducing a new dimension to wildlife conservation by helping researchers anywhere in the world assess the conditions of distant species and environments as if they were on location. The first application has been to better understand the environment of endangered… Read more »

  • Mercury: ‘first rock from the sun’ in transit

    Mercury: ‘first rock from the sun’ in transit David Rothery, The Open University Live: Mercury transit The solar system’s smallest and most remarkable planet, Mercury, will cross the face of the sun on May 9 – offering a great opportunity for people in many places across the world to see it. Mercury is a dark… Read more »

  • How could we build an invisibility cloak to hide Earth from an alien civilization?

    How could we build an invisibility cloak to hide Earth from an alien civilization? David Kipping, Columbia University What would it take to hide an entire planet? It sounds more like a question posed in an episode of “Star Trek” than in academic discourse, but sometimes the bleeding edge of science blurs with themes found… Read more »

  • How to launch a rocket into space … and then land it on a ship at sea

    How to launch a rocket into space … and then land it on a ship at sea Hugh Hunt, University of Cambridge On Friday 8 April 2016, SpaceX’s Falcon 9 rocket launched a mission to deliver a spacecraft called Dragon with its payload of supplies and experiments into a trajectory towards the International Space Station… Read more »

  • How secure is your smartphone’s lock screen?

    How secure is your smartphone’s lock screen? Clinton Carpene, Edith Cowan University One consequence of the Apple vs FBI drama has been to shine a spotlight on the security of smartphone lockscreens. The fact that the FBI managed to hack the iPhone of the San Bernardino shooter without Apple’s help raises questions about whether PIN… Read more »

  • What makes us conscious?

    What makes us conscious? Matthew Davidson, Monash University Do you think that the machine you are reading this story on, right now, has a feeling of “what it is like” to be in its state? What about a pet dog? Does it have a sense of what it’s like to be in its state? It… Read more »

  • Ten myths about smoking that will not die

    Ten myths about smoking that will not die Simon Chapman, University of Sydney Across forty years I’ve come to recognise many factoid-driven myths about smoking that just won’t die. If I asked for a dollar each time I had to refute these statements, I’d have accumulated a small fortune. Their persistence owes much to their… Read more »

  • 5 Ways to beat the Hangover

    1) Coconut water is a natural drink that heals the dizziness as hangover “Coconut water possessed potassium which overcomes the advent of hangover. 2) If you want to remove that headache, it is recommended to include breakfast with carbohydrates and low fat protein foods such as egg whites and whole wheat breads which supply energy… Read more »

  • Explainer: The science behind leap years and how they work

    Explainer: the science behind leap years and how they work Daniel Brown, Nottingham Trent University Most of the time, a year is made up of 365 days. But this year, just like 2012, and the year four years before that, has 366. And that vital extra day, a leap day, is (partly) what keeps our… Read more »

  • The changing role of cities in the world of fashion

    From paragons to melting pots: the changing role of cities in the world of fashion Naomi Braithwaite, Nottingham Trent University Alongside New York, Paris and Milan, London Fashion Week is one of the most important and influential dates in the style calendar. But while internationally renowned models and designers gather to present the Autumn/Winter 2016… Read more »

  • Gravitational waves discovered: the universe has spoken

    Gravitational waves discovered: the universe has spoken David Blair, University of Western Australia Up until now, humanity has been deaf to the gravitational “sounds” of the universe. At last, we have heard our first message. On September 14, 2015, the first data arrived! Our observation of the gravitational waves from the merger of two black… Read more »

  • Is our Milky Way galaxy a zombie, already dead and we don’t know it?

    Is our Milky Way galaxy a zombie, already dead and we don’t know it? Kevin Schawinski, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich Like a zombie, the Milky Way galaxy may already be dead but it still keeps going. Our galactic neighbor Andromeda almost certainly expired a few billion years ago, but only recently started showing… Read more »

  • Flat wrong: the misunderstood history of flat Earth theories

    Flat wrong: the misunderstood history of flat Earth theories Chris Fleming, Western Sydney University For most people, being described as a “flat Earther” is an insult. The idea of the Earth being flat is considered not only wrong, but a model of wrongness, the gold standard of being incorrect about something. This being so, oddly… Read more »

  • 10 great books that all children should read

    10 great books that all children should read Belle Alderman, University of Canberra The books we remember strongly as adults are often the ones we read as children. Not only do we remember particular books, but the emotions we experienced. Children’s books are reread and remembered over a lifetime, and many authors believe their best… Read more »

  • Weighing up the evidence for the ‘Historical Jesus’

    Weighing up the evidence for the ‘Historical Jesus’ Raphael Lataster, University of Sydney Did a man called Jesus of Nazareth walk the earth? Discussions over whether the figure known as the “Historical Jesus” actually existed primarily reflect disagreements among atheists. Believers, who uphold the implausible and more easily-dismissed “Christ of Faith” (the divine Jesus who… Read more »

  • Home alone feeling scrooged? These Christmas movies deserve some love, actually

    Home alone feeling scrooged? These Christmas movies deserve some love, actually Ari Mattes, University of Notre Dame Australia The cultural environment in which we watch a film inevitably shapes our response to it. Engaging with the Yuletide ecology by watching Christmas films offers a genuine cinephilic pleasure, be it kitsch, ironic, or sincere. The following… Read more »

  • What’s it like to see auroras on other planets?

    What’s it like to see auroras on other planets? Nathan Case, Lancaster University Witnessing an aurora first-hand is a truly awe-inspiring experience. The natural beauty of the northern or southern lights captures the public imagination unlike any other aspect of space weather. But auroras aren’t unique to Earth and can be seen on several other… Read more »

  • The deadly truth about loneliness

    The deadly truth about loneliness Michelle H Lim, Swinburne University of Technology Almost all of us have experienced loneliness at some point. It is the pain we have felt following a breakup, perhaps the loss of a loved one, or a move away from home. We are vulnerable to feeling lonely at any point in… Read more »

  • NASA: streaks of salt on Mars mean flowing water, and raise new hopes of finding life

    NASA: streaks of salt on Mars mean flowing water, and raise new hopes of finding life David Rothery, The Open University Salty streaks have been discovered on Mars, which could be a sign that salt water seeps to the surface in the summers. Scientists have previously observed dark streaks (see image above) on the planet’s… Read more »

  • I’m a librarian who banned a book. Here’s why.

    I’m a librarian who banned a book. Here’s why. Scott DiMarco, Mansfield University of Pennsylvania In the library world, access to information is a human right, not to be tampered with or controlled in any way. The books that line the shelves have been carefully selected by a trained librarian to offer the reader a… Read more »

  • Six easy ways to tell if that viral story is a hoax

    Six easy ways to tell if that viral story is a hoax Pete Brown, University of Oxford “And so it begins … ISIS flag among refugees in Germany fighting the police,” blared the headline on the Conservative Post; “with this new leaked picture, everything seems confirmed”. The image in question purported to show a group… Read more »

  • Don’t freak if you can’t solve a math problem that’s gone viral

    Don’t freak if you can’t solve a math problem that’s gone viral Kevin Knudson, University of Florida It’s been quite a year for mathematics problems on the internet. In the last few months, three questions have been online everywhere, causing consternation and head-scratching and blowing the minds of adults worldwide as examples of what kids… Read more »

  • Transport’s innovation problem: why haven’t flying cars taken off?

    Transport’s innovation problem: why haven’t flying cars taken off? John Preston, University of Southampton and Ben Waterson, University of Southampton Flying cars in The Jetsons and Back to the Future, or Star Trek’s spaceships and teleportation, may have captured the imagination decades ago, but most current methods of transport have been around a long time…. Read more »

  • The future of rail travel, and why it doesn’t look like Hyperloop

    The future of rail travel, and why it doesn’t look like Hyperloop Roberto Palacin , Newcastle University As the world’s population becomes increasingly urbanised, it is estimated that the number of journeys measured in passenger-kilometres will triple by 2050. Roads simply can’t absorb this increase. Railways, with their greater capacity for carrying more people, quickly… Read more »

  • Which paintings were the most creative of their time? An algorithm may hold the answers

    Which paintings were the most creative of their time? An algorithm may hold the answers Ahmed Elgammal , Rutgers University From Picasso’s The Young Ladies of Avignon to Munch’s The Scream, what was it about these paintings that arrested people’s attention upon viewing them, that cemented them in the canon of art history as iconic… Read more »

  • 9 Animated Maps That Will Change The Way You See The World

  • Animated map showing how religion spread across the world!

  • Health warning: five fashion trends that are terrible for you

    Health warning: five fashion trends that are terrible for you Naomi Braithwaite, Nottingham Trent University The media frenzy after a woman was hospitalised for wearing skinny jeans has seen a fervent increase of interest in the medical dangers of certain fashion trends. But the health hazards of wearing tight clothing are not a recent discovery…. Read more »

  • Intelligent life in the universe? Phone home, dammit!

    Intelligent life in the universe? Phone home, dammit! Robert Scherrer, Vanderbilt University We’ve been conditioned by television and movies to accept the likelihood of intelligent life elsewhere in the universe. “Of course there’s intelligent life out there; I saw it last week on Star Trek.” We’ve seen it all, from the cute and cuddly ET… Read more »

  • From Newton to Hawking and beyond: a short history of the Lucasian Chair

    From Newton to Hawking and beyond: a short history of the Lucasian Chair Kevin Orrman-Rossiter, University of Melbourne and Morgan Saletta, University of Melbourne On July 1 physicist Michael Cates will be the 19th person to sit in what is perhaps the most prestigious “chair” in science when he assumes the post of the Lucasian… Read more »

  • Eight hours is enough – more sleep could lead to an early grave

    Eight hours is enough – more sleep could lead to an early grave Dorothy Bruck, Victoria University Sleep is vital for good health but more of it may not always be better for everyone. Research recently published in the journal Neurology has found middle-aged and older people who sleep more than eight hours a day… Read more »

  • Health Check: why do some people feel the cold more than others?

    Health Check: why do some people feel the cold more than others? Duncan Mitchell, University of Western Australia; Andrea Fuller, University of the Witwatersrand, and Shane Maloney, University of Western Australia When HMS Beagle docked at the southern tip of Tierra del Fuego, Charles Darwin remarked on the capacity of the locals to deal with… Read more »

  • Sci-fi and Jurassic Park have driven research, scientists say

    Sci-fi and Jurassic Park have driven research, scientists say Elizabeth Jones, UCL The park is almost open. Two decades on and Jurassic Park has morphed into Jurassic World, the one and only dinosaur theme park. Science has apparently evolved too: the genetically-engineered dinosaurs are to take a secondary role to a new star of the… Read more »

  • A little number theory makes the times table a thing of beauty

    A little number theory makes the times table a thing of beauty Anita Ponsaing, University of Melbourne Most people will probably remember the times tables from primary school quizzes. There might be patterns in some of them (the simple doubling of the 2 times table) but others you just learnt by rote. And it was… Read more »

  • Busting myths: a practical guide to countering science denial

    Busting myths: a practical guide to countering science denial John Cook, The University of Queensland It should go without saying that science should dictate how we respond to science denial. So what does scientific research tell us? One effective way to reduce the influence of science denial is through “inoculation”: you can build resistance to… Read more »

  • Four easy tips to make your batteries last longer

    Four easy tips to make your batteries last longer Valentin Muenzel, University of Melbourne Here are a few things you can do to make your lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries last longer, whether they be used in an electric car, a large home installation – such as Tesla’s newly announced Powerwall – or in your portable device,… Read more »

  • Is this the end of particle physics as we know it? Let’s hope not

    Is this the end of particle physics as we know it? Let's hope not Tom Whyntie, Queen Mary University of London Physicists around the world (myself included) are hoping that this week will mark the beginning of a new era of discovery. And not, as some fear, the end of particle physics as we know… Read more »

  • Rare glimpse: satellites catch the birth of two volcanic islands

    Rare glimpse: satellites catch the birth of two volcanic islands Dave McGarvie, The Open University The birth of a volcanic island is a potent and beautiful reminder of our dynamic planet’s ability to make new land. Given the destruction we’ve seen following natural events like earthquakes and tsunamis in the past few years, stunning images… Read more »

  • This once-stable Antarctic region has suddenly started melting

    This once-stable Antarctic region has suddenly started melting Bert Wouters, University of Bristol Antarctica’s glaciers have been making headlines during the past year, and not in a good way. Whether it’s a massive ice shelf facing imminent risk of collapse, glaciers in the West Antarctic past the point of no return, or new threats to… Read more »